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Today we had to put down our dog of 10 years. Doing so broke our hearts. There in the vet’s office, under the dim glow of a paper lamp, we said our final farewell’s to the pooch we loved so much. She gave us love in the form of nuzzles and whimpers. Always faithful, always happy, and naive as we were, we thought she would always be with us.

 

This was always coming, we knew it deep down in our hearts. We just didn’t want to accept it. Now the house is silent. We won’t hear her tail thumping on the floor when we arrive inside the door. Won’t hear her greeting barks when an electronic buzzer or alarm rings. The laundry room will no longer echo with the sloshing sounds of water being lapped from her dish. We will no longer hear the sounds of four claws on the floor, scampering to and fro across the back door to front door. The house is eerily quiet when the kids are at school now.

 

 When we built the house in 2005. I wasn’t a dog person. I was actually against getting a dog. After some convincing, Tracie won me over and started looking on ARF (animal Rescue Foundation) for dogs to adopt. After about 2 weeks of solid Searching, we picked up a black and brown German Shepard-Bordie collie mix.

 

 It certainly didn’t take a long time before I was won over. After the first day of visitation we made up our minds, and the rest, as they say, is history.

 

 

Chemo on the first visit home. There was attitude from day one.

 

Many would ask why we chose the name Chemo for our dog. The name means something, it comes from our time spent at the cancer ward. In return, we would give our dog a purpose, a meaning along with a very special name.

 

She was always making us laugh. We might have built the house, but she made it a home. Always greeting us at the door, her tail wagging. In her later years it would make a ‘WHAP’ sound against the floor downstairs.

 

Chemo got to meet Auntie Maggie, our parent’s dog. The two were fast friends. Maggie was usually the alpha. Whenever they got together, they played until they were exhausted.

 

Chemo loved playing. Loved her stuffed animals and her toys. And we in turn loved wrestling them away or watching her happily chew them.

 

Chemo was there when we became man and wife. And she shared many milestones with us as moved into different exciting chapters in our lives.

 

When we became first time parents she would endless pace up and down the hallway listening for the slightest sound. After a few sleepless nights we realized she wasn’t trying to wake up our baby, she was pre-emptively sensing she would awake soon.

 

When our second child was born, she was ready to be the protector. The guardian that only allowed trusted family and friends near the kids.

 

She had the most gentle demeanor. Always willing to let the kids climb and play all over her.

 

She never showed any sign of aggression. She was gentle, loving, caring.

 

She never complained. Being cramped in that little car. On long car trips to grandma and grandpa’s 6 hours away.

 

She loved walks, inclement weather or not.

 

And like any member of the family, she was present on family vacations both close and abroad.

 

In her later years, when she was getting too sore for walks, she would often poke her head under the fridge door.

 

The last weekend. We treated her to bacon, cheese, popcorn and all sorts of other food goodies.

 

On her last weekend, we showered her with hugs and kisses. Gave into her food wishes, letting her sample bacon, pizza crusts and apple slices with peanut butter. We pet her with tear stained hands and nuzzled our faces into her fur. Breathing in deep her scent to try to capture and remember her as she was.

Chemo Beano, you’re in a better place now. When you open your eyes again, you’ll be surrounded by endless sunny green hills and fields. Where you will be restored to full health, without a memory of the pain that agonized you. Here you can run forever without becoming tired. Here you can lie and roll in the cool grass after playing, running and jumping. You will meet up again with Auntie Maggie and frolic with Clancy. You will never be hungry or thirsty again. Never cold nor in discomfort again.

 

You were more than a pet. You were a sentry, a guardian, a companion and our best friend. Always willing to go for walks, always wanting to play. You were family, and we included you in vacations, traveling and activities. You answered the door with barks, woke us up by nuzzling our hands with your wet nose, and always knew when food was being prepared. We will remember you always Chemo, as the faithful dog that stole our hearts with your soft fur, fuzzy floppy ears and insatiable appetite.

 

Good bye Chemo Beano we will always love you.

 

Chemo Anderson Yap
Feb 2006 – Jan 2017